Human Brain Capacity in Terabytes

Storage is a hot commodity in my organization.  We have 100TB’s and still need more.  We have many databases that grow daily, some with millions of records.  When I take a step back, I say “Wow, that’s a ton of data”.  I have heard that Yahoo has an open “tab” with NetApp buying terabytes per day.

I was recently asked what I thought the human brain capacity was in terabytes.  I recalling hearing around 10TB.  I dug a bit on the Internet and found these estimates:

Robert Birge (Syracuse University) who studies the storage of data in proteins, estimated in 1996 that the memory capacity of the brain was between one and ten terabytes, with a most likely value of 3 terabytes. Such estimates are generally based on counting neurons and assuming each neuron holds 1 bit. Bear in mind that the brain has better algorithms for compressing certain types of information than computers do. Source

The human brain contains about 50 billion to 200 billion neurons (nobody knows how many for sure), each of which interfaces with 1,000 to 100,000 other neurons through 100 trillion (10 14) to 10 quadrillion (10 16) synaptic junctions. Each synapse possesses a variable firing threshold which is reduced as the neuron is repeatedly activated. If we assume that the firing threshold at each synapse can assume 256 distinguishable levels, and if we suppose that there are 20,000 shared synapses per neuron (10,000 per neuron), then the total information storage capacity of the synapses in the cortex would be of the order of 500 to 1,000 terabytes. (Of course, if the brain’s storage of information takes place at a molecular level, then I would be afraid to hazard a guess regarding how many bytes can be stored in the brain. One estimate has placed it at about 3.6 X 10 19 bytes.) Source

The brain has about 100 billion nerve cells, so at least that many bits (about 10 gigabytes) could be stored, assuming the brain uses binary logic. But it probably doesn’t do so. Instead, information is believed to be stored in the many connections that form between the cells. This is a much larger number: Current estimates of brain capacity range from 1 to 1000 terabytes! It would take 1,000 to 10,000 typical disk drives to store that much information. Source

It looks like we could replace all of our storage systems with one human.  Any volunteers?

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70 responses to “Human Brain Capacity in Terabytes

  1. The last estimate seems to be very out dated seeing as it says the typical hard drive is about 1GB and it doesn’t seem too educated. From what I have seen the estimate ranges from 3 to 10TB with most favoring less than 6TB.

  2. Roughly 312.250226 exabytes

  3. This would be near impossible to calculate until such a time as man can create biological computers of our own and have a better idea how they work.

    I do know the human brain has near-instant data recall time, far faster than that of the fastest computer memory… though this recall time slows with such things as mental acuity, age, etc. These factors also reduce the reliability of biological memory (similar to the way computer memory wears out, I suppose).

    This is an interesting question. I would also find it interesting to know the computational speed of the human brain in GHz, though this would probably vary from one individual to the next as well.

    I wonder if our brains and our computers will ever be able to interface in any major ways? It’d be fun to be able to record my dreams as mpgs to watch whenever I want. Or better yet, copy mpgs to my brain to dream them instead of making up a dream :)

  4. The fastest frequency a neuron can reach is 500hz , or 0.0000005Ghz your brain is on a whole slower by a few factors depending on what you look for.
    typical clocks for the brain are probably abt 10-20hz but it differs.

  5. Have learned to regenerate a shattered kneecap and a crushed intervertebral disc by the use of willpower through my brain. Considering that current medicine denies the possibility of regenerating cartilaginous tisse, how can one teach others to use the brain as a tool? Have described the required process in a book. The potential is as large as the brain; so why not develop the technique?

    Simon

  6. Best current info or anyone really interested in human brain, as follows: “Robert Birge (Syracuse University) who studies the storage of data in proteins estimated in 1996 that the memory capacity of the brain was between one and ten terabytes, with a most likely value of 3 terabytes. Such estimates are generally based on counting neurons and assuming each neuron holds 1 bit. Bear in mind that the brain has far better algorithms for compressing certain types of information than computers do. Source
    The human brain contains about 50 billion to 200 billion neurons (nobody knows how many for sure), each of which interfaces with 1,000 to 100,000 other neurons through 100 trillion (10 14) to 10 quadrillion (10 16) synaptic junctions. Each synapse possesses a variable firing threshold which is reduced as the neuron is repeatedly activated. If we assume that the firing threshold at each synapse can assume 256 distinguishable levels, and if we suppose that there are 20,000 shared synapses per neuron (10,000 per neuron), then the total information storage capacity of the synapses in the cortex would be of the order of 500 to 1,000 terabytes. (Of course, if the brain’s storage of information takes place at a molecular level, then I would be afraid to hazard a guess regarding how many bytes can be stored in the brain. One estimate has placed it at about 3.6 X 10 19 bytes.) Source
    The brain has about 100 billion nerve cells, so at least that many bits (about 10 gigabytes) could be stored, assuming the brain uses binary logic. But it probably doesn’t do so. Instead, information is believed to be stored in the many connections that form between the cells. This is a much larger number: Current estimates of brain capacity range from 1 to 1000 terabytes! It would take 1,000 to 10,000 typical disk drives to store that much information.”

    The above about covers current info regarding brain´s capacity as compared to comp equivalent. Nevertheless, this only scratches the surface of the brain issue, which seems to be as huge as a nano universe.

    Simon Says
    Source

    • I’m thinking that the brain is not binary because if it was we would be closer to neanderthals if not still and we wouldn’t be having this discussion. Theres no telling how it works exactly and humans might never know.

  7. I’m no expert in any of these related subjects, but I find this kind of stuff extremely fascinating. I think to myself, “Hook a computer up to a brain and see how much data you can put onto it.” This sounds easy in theory, but I’m sure there’s tons of technological hurdles to overcome first. It would seem to me that as long as the brain is kept alive, the information should stay intact. Then again I would think the trouble with that is finding a ‘blank’ brain to start with. You most likely can’t use a donor brain because it has already been molded and neurologically altered over time, to form the person(ality) of the donor.

    • If you could figure out how to connect a brain to a computer and make it work then certainly you could find a way to format it. Personally i dont think there is a limit other than death but thats just me. If a one and a half hour movie takes roughly a gb of data then every hour of every day should take at least that in storage. Check out my post farther down about the limits to understand what im talking about.

    • One major technological hurdle would be to not fry the brain. When you hook up say a thumb drive to the computer, you obviously know that data is transferred via electricity. To gather info from the brain, we would need a current that wouldn’t fry the brain but we would also need to make sure the electrical impulses of the brain are strong enough to send data over a copper wire and into something that can process them into data that is readable which brings us to our next two problems. If the electrical impulses aren’t powerful enough then we would have to figure out a way to amplify them. Secondly, we would have to identify the logic of the brain which more than likely isn’t binary like computers which consist of 1 and 0. This brings us to another problem: translating the brains logic into binary logic. Everything computer based is binary. Java,C++ and Visual Basic are all different computer languages built up from other less advanced computer languages. Eventually when you break these down enough, you get to binary logic. The brain on the other hand has to be broke down into something else completely different. its possible that binary logic was thought of based on some underlying subconscious understanding of the brain.

  8. By contrast, human DNA contains around 2.4 x 10^8 bits of information*, which is around 125 MB. I guess that’s why we’re born ‘blank’ unlike most animals and have to learn everything from scratch, as DNA has enough information to build cells, but not enough to tell us what to do, how to walk etc.

    *Extraterrestrials, Where are They?, SE, Cambridge University Press 1995

  9. SEO, I am not really sure what you are trying to say. Yes, we are born blank, and have to learn most of the information which ends up in our heads, but that is true of every animal. Unless you are talking about single celled organisms, there are no species which receive the data they need to survive exclusively from DNA.

    • Couldn’t agree with you more. SEO should watch Animal Planet or National Geographic They are bound to see young animals such as bears watching the maternal parent catch fish or something because they are trying to learn. Not every living creature does learn and not every creature survives but thats life and it isn’t perfect in the human sense.

    • what about reptiles which hatch from eggs when their parents have left, they instinctively hunt for food/warmth. this must be down to instinct I would of thought which would mean that its been inherited, which could only come from the DNA, (like others in this topic im facinated and by no way in the know!)

      I’m just a reptile owner who has watched a new born break from an egg and continually try to eat a cricket which was far to big for it. but we had it in a seperate birthing viv with no contact from the mother at all or other geckos (crested)

  10. I would like to have the following information pertains to the storage capacity of human brain.
    1.Total capacity of an unborn child at 8th or 9th month of pregnancy.
    a) percentage used
    b)percentage unused.
    2.Capacity of a just born child, also used and unused.
    3.Cap of one year old child, % used and % unused
    4.On completion of matriculation, %used and % unused.
    5.Used and unused percentage of a doctor, Graduate (MBBS)
    6.Same as above for post graduate doctor.
    The reply may kindly be posted to the above mail ID.

    • Your thinking follows closely with mine except I consider the brain to be infinite as of right now. Read my post down below to see what I mean

  11. The brain can’t really be compared to a computer though, because computers have one (ish) central processor, some short-term storage, and some long-term storage, and that one processor follows instructions from software. The brain is more like a single large circuit, with no real dedicated “memory” or “processor” – just doing everything in “hardware”. Closer perhaps to a GPU. There’s not just a “core” fetching information from memory, modifying it, and sending it back; it’s like a huge network of transistors. The state of every one of those transistors defines the content of memory, what it’s doing right now, and how it will respond to input.

    Of course, neurons are not transistors, and the circuit is not necessarily hardwired. The circuitry can change on the fly. It’s really nothing like anything humans have built, and we have very little understanding of how it really works.

    • It is more like a computer than you think. When you put a cd that contains microsoft word into a computer and install, the disk drive reads the data and stores it in ram. The cpu decides what to do with this data, either to let it go or write it to the hdd. Not everything is stored in ram at once in small but small packets and then put on the hdd at select intervals. When things are being wrote on the hdd, it goes to ram first then the hdd second. If the ram is good then it writes relatively quickly, whereas if the ram is bad it writes slowly or not at all. The average person would work like a working computer whereas one with a mental problem would be like one that is slow or not working at all. Aside from these two you have more advanced people that can be compared to machines such as servers that contain more ram and faster processors. These advanced people are more like Einstein where they process and store data at a faster rate and have a better understanding in general. Now when it comes to writing to hdd, it depends on the type. IDE drives usually spin at 5000rpm while SATA drives spin at 7200rpm which means SATA drive can store and retrieve data much more quickly than an IDE drive.

    • AH-64 Longbow

      Think SoC. Most modern definition do not include RAM but the Brain is like a 10lb +/- System on a Chip. Try Fabing that. Also remember that it is asynchronous CISC. Certain portions of the brain are optimized to perform certain functions. For example many people are awful at math. However the brain computes massive calculation to accomplish throwing a ball on target. There is a guy in California that can do math through these functions, we think. He was on super humans a while back.
      It is all about having the instruction sets.
      Q: MIPS or variable precision FLOPS.

  12. I have to disagree with Robert Birge. Theoretically speaking, the brain has an infinite amount of storage. Recently it was discovered that if the things the average human learns in one year was broke down into 4 minute songs, that it would take 2 billion years to listen to all of them. I did some calculations and found it would take roughly 1.5 billion terabytes to store 1 years worth of learned things. The reason I say roughly is considering the song size in megabytes for 4 minutes is 4-6 mb I used 5 for an average and came up with 1503753662.10938 tb for that year. To figure out how much you have learned in your life you would simply multiply this number time your age in years. You could use other terms to shorten the number down but for the common person who is relatively computer illiterate and has only seen a terabyte in their pc, I figured I’d give them a number that is easier to wrap their mind around. Anyway, in a manner of speaking, the maximum amount a brain can store depends on the person themselves. If I died at 40, I’d have a brain storage capacity of 60150146484.3752 tb. The 1.5 billion tb number is for the average adult human so therefore between the time someone is born and when they get done with college, they will have amassed more data per year than they will after college per year. If I have a kid and they get done with college at 25 then they will more than likely store over half the data in the first 25 years of their life than they would in the second twenty five years of their life. Beyond 50 years old, the person typically becomes less active and therefore is exposed to less data so there should be a steady drop in data amassed. To get an exact size on the brain is therefore impossible and it would be best assumed to be either infinite or to multiply the age of the brain at death times 1.5 billion tb, The latter of the two would depend on more than just age because it depends on the lifestyle they have had. Someone in a medical or computer environment for the majority of life will have experienced more storage consuming things than say a mechanic or plumber.

    • If I have a kid and they get done with college at 25 then they will more than likely store more data in the first 25 years of their life than they would in the second twenty five years of their life. Had to fix an error…

    • Aren’t you forgetting something…we may be storing a lot of memories in our college days but consider that the brain stores EVERY piece of data that comes through our senses…everything we hear and see. Though these ‘little’ memories may be hard to retrieve, we easily retrieve many and more detail can be dredged up via hypnosis. When you add every little thing we seen, heard, smelled or felt to all the learned data to which you seem to refer, the storage of data goes on, really unabated by age. The amount of data stored is almost unimaginable.

  13. As I understand it, the brain does not only store things by state, but also by frequency of use, so as someone else mentioned the things requested often are likely to be retrieved faster. This makes the human brain more efficient than a computer by several orders of magnitude due to the fact that each neuron is accessed in a mesh technology that morphs by need, not a fixed serial bus like computers. The speed of response is more like 1 million slower mini-processors each with ram attached. We also assume often that the brain itself is the only thing sending signals to parts of our bodies, but doctors have proven that even the branching nervous system stems have a limited “memory” for quick reflex responses. If the foot had to wait for your brain to process the signals from your eye and send the signal to your foot to press the brake when your are driving a car the whole process would take to long resulting in many more accidents than happen now. These are stored in a reflex memory dedicated for things requiring a fast response.
    What I am saying is that we can’t JUST focus on the brain. The whole nervous system plays a part in the way things are stored and retrieved. Obviously, the lesser used things can take longer to remember, and some things are never remembered again. It seems sometimes that the brain knows when something is no longer needed and replaces it with something else giving us the illusion of infinite storage, but in fact we forgot something that we will never likely use again.
    So I don’t think we have infinite storage, but I do think the storage amount is still far beyond what people think now. We are still thinking linearly like the way computers store, calculate and transfer things. The nervous system does not work linearly. In fact, it can speed up and slow down as needed. Ever notice how you drive on the highway for a long time and when you get off everything seems slow for awhile? This is an effect caused by your brain changing the input speed from your eyes to accommodate the faster speed of the highway. Your brain is always trying to be efficient, so if it doesn’t HAVE to process incoming data quickly it slows down. This saves energy and lets you rest to be ready for the next mental endeavor.
    As for getting older, if you are very healthy you are likely to continue to store information well. I know of a few in their 90’s that can remember new names, faces, etc better than me. But like anyone, if your health declines, so does your brain’s ability to function to store new things. It becomes difficult to learn new things when you are focused on how your body is failing or suffering. However, many elderly people can still remember things they have memorized years ago, but they just can’t remember what they did yesterday. I am excepting the cases that develop an actual mental disorder that directly affects the brain of course. Also, the older we get, the more likely such a disorder can develop.
    In fact, it would seem that as our body slows down as we get older our mental response declines in speed as well. Again, as I said earlier I define this as an efficiency article. As you get older it is more necessary to be more efficient with energy because you often have less available. So the brain thinks, lets slow down to save energy so we can do other more important things with that energy. I don’t see this as a failure of the brain, but an intelligent response to a declining situation. This, in effect, reduces the speed of developing new synapses and reduces the speed at which the replacement of information occurs. Thereby causing them to be able to remember many thing from years ago, but more often forget what they did yesterday. That is why people who exercise and maintain their health, often have better abilities to memorize late in life than those that don’t.
    This makes your theories about memory even more complex Joe than you even mentioned above, since like you said it is dependent on the person, but not just how long they live. It also depends on how healthy a lifestyle they lead. Now as for the brain not having an infinite storage capacity, that is because there is still a limited amount of physical space inside your head and even your head has limits on how many synapses can occupy the same 3D space to connect the neurons. So I disagree about infinite, but certainly it can be a lot.

  14. This reminds me of the april fools joke about backing up your memory. I cant find it at the minute but it was quite big at the time and I know at least 1 person who actually believed it!

    Anyway, surely the amount of “data” that can be stored is irrelevent as a memory of a phone number would use a different amount of space in your brain than 11bytes in a file on a physical hard disc etc.

  15. look, if human DNA didn’t age and break up we could probably store about 1000 years+ of information. Scientists aren’t even sure if the brain stores information at all, some hypothesize that memory is stored outside of the brain, that makes the brain a reciever. But unfortunately we degrade with age, kids are the most powerful “computers” because they learn with their senses and generally apply more of their potential brainpower, everyone can do this but with age we get conditioned not to. besides you cannot call the human brain a computer, the left half of the brain operates like one on logical premises, however our right side of the brain is so complicated that it defies logic and is there fore incomparable, computers only surpass humans on logical processing capability. Humans also have feelings an emotions, these are unmeasurable by logic.
    In quantum mechanics our minds creates the reality which we exist in, so the mind is quite more than you would expect, and definitely more than computers. A lot of it comes down to the fact that our brain is an amazing instrument, but we are yet getting the idea of how to use it.

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  19. I am late in this conversation but here is my input:
    The human brain as stated above cannot be compared to an electronic machine running on code language. How powerful it is in memory and capability is uncharted and unimaginable, well maybe we can imagine…
    Keep those synapses snapping! No telling where the human race will end up.

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  21. I can’t seem to be able to reach this site from my smartphone!

  22. I have often wondered what we can hold as far as information in the brain. I am a musician and a champion chess player from Junior High School long ago. I have always been told that my memory is unbelievable, but taking a PC Class has me in doubt. When I worked in communications and went through extensive training on products and services, at night during training time, I would make fun of myself when waking up that my brain would “be shorting out” as I would recall dreams about mistakes, being lost, or even being back at High School. What makes one “recall” something from a childhood day, but not able to recall what you studied just hours earlier? Hence, the question of what a Brain can hold will never be answered, but the idea of “downloading info into the brain” is fascinating. There actually is a Star Trek from the ’60s that shows that Dr. McCoy had to download info into his brain in order to perform Brain Surgery on Mr. Spock, but then lost the memory due to natural Mal-function of the brain. Even though a far-fetched episode, brilliant was and is an understatement. Everyday at my job I say, “I wish I knew what my co-workers knew”… I sincerely believe that if you are interested in something, you will retain the knowledge…if it was an enjoyable or life changing event, you will remember, no matter what room is left on you natural “computer” called your brain. Your brain will purge constantly to make room for other things.

  23. amazing human brain, unfortunately many people who do not maximize the advantages of this

  24. such a very good information give whoes the person in insertwd brief in stydy mind related

  25. Unfortunately, the capacity of the human brain is much smaller than most people think. You can not estimate it basing on the construction of the brain, because you can not write or read information in such low-level way. Capacity can be estimated for example by calculating how much data is entering the brain. These estimates do exist and talk about 10 bytes per second or less. This corresponds roughly to a normal speech. Anyway: try to read aloud a book for 10 hours and remember everything. This is the speed of 10 bytes per second. Assuming that we learn without interruption (except for sleeping) for 50 years and remember everything, we get about 10 gigabytes of information. Much less than these mentioned here thousands of terabytes. Unfortunately, it seems that the content of the brain could fit on one DVD disc (fortunately, a dual-layer one).

    • I recently learned something new. Anytime you see a face whether it be in dreams or your eyes playing tricks, you have seen that face before becausr the human mind cannot create one randomly. Therefore the brain stores at least some things indefinately. You dont have to even really focus on someone to remembet their face, if you could take someones memory of shopping at a mall, pause it, and walk around in it, yould would find everything and everyone as they were that day. What you remember and what you saw are two different things and they also add to brain storage capacity.

  26. asdfasdfasdf asdfasdfasdf

    There is really no way to accurately determine the storage capacity of a human brain, but I believe that it is between 100,000gb & 100,000,000gb would be a decent guess. When calculating the storage capacity of a human brain, I use a different theory. Let’s consider our eyes. Various resources estimate the resolution of an average human eye @ around 10 to 50 megapixels. 3.1 megapixel image takes up 9.3 MB. If every waking second, the eye is “recording” that much data….over the course of an average human lifespan….well, do the math. Granted this calculation is not even taking into consideration auditory & mental data, which would account for even more storage capacity.

  27. Let me calculate the brain capacity in a novel way. If a DVD contains 4 gigabytes and it typically stores one two-dimensional move of 1 hour, then a homo sapiens during a life time of 90 years should store about 3 petabytes (3000 tera bytes), if presumably the stored material is in HD. However, I believe that it is much higher since we can think in 4 dimensions (the forth is time), do not forget the smells, etc. Could you try the following experiment to see what I am talking about. Locate one particular place in your memory, for example your house, and then try to rotate it in 3 dimensions, in other words try to see it from very different angles, and different heights. Now, place this “movie” in the upper left part of your vision, and think about any other scene from your life, etc. Only after this experiment you will see .that the capacity of brain is at least 1 exabyte (1000 petabytes).

  28. >2010
    >Not compressing the mind into 36 bytes and sending it up to 48 hours in the past
    Come on science, step it up.

  29. Based on current evaluations and as far as we are concerned its capacity is……limitless.

  30. Gunnar Olafsson

    I think easy comparisons can be made without difficulties between a brain and a binary drive.

    For fun we can use a rough measurement easily grasped by everyone, grams. Now as unlogical as it may seems bear with me for a minute. :)

    Our blueprint is transferred via a single cell which has twirling tail . I realize more is transferred, but it gives us an idea of how compressed our data storage is.
    So for fun lets say only one “blueprint” is within a sperm cell(0,001grams)
    and a human DNA is estimated to be around 800 megabytes.
    (now enjoy the time spent in calculating how much DNA fits does indeed fit inside a sperm cell, haha)
    There we have a rough unit to compare to.

    Brain(commonly believed to be the bodies only storage device) being around 1500grams on average we could then say that inside a brain 1.500.000 sperm cell will fit(according to weight comparison) so only 1.1petabyte of storage would be a rough calculation.
    But the we can sink ourself into the effect of neurons on this silly estimate. Connectivity within the brain is phenomenal and the fact that it is interconnected and although it sends signal it is estimated to do so on 260ish distinguishable levels. SO.
    1.1peta x connections x 260 ish would give us a rough idea of how wast it really is.

    Hope I didnt bore you with this. Please correct me and take this to a more refined level. I have infront of me a chocolate easter egg and cant be bothered to refine. ;)

  31. In response to Joe Boney:
    I’ll admit I didn’t read all of your posts, but the way you consider the brain to work seems to be flawed.
    It is nothing like the computers we have today. Put simply, the brain works through its connections. A memory is stored as a pattern of cells – a signal can originate in one or more cells and via the connections between cells, the conductivity of each connection, the strength of the original signal, attenuation and amplification of the signal as it passes through successive neurons, the memory is recalled.

    The brain does NOT store all of the information that flows into it. You seem to suggest that the brain is storing every instant of our lives as a video. But I know that I, nor anyone else on this planet has perfect recall of our day-to-day lives which would be made possible by this kind of recording. Our brain stores patterns. It stores pieces of what we encounter based on whether or not it considers the information important. Then, upon recall of a piece of information, a HUGE series of events takes place where the brain looks for and puts forward a vast amount of relevant information. Using all of this, a memory is pieced together which is often surprisingly accurate over the big picture, but almost always has several minor flaws.

    This is only a high level description of how the brain works, but this is the currently accepted theory. We still don’t know how the brain organizes information, creates new memories or recalls existing ones.

    I don’t think it’s fair to make any estimates of the capacity of the brain because of how differently it works than what we’re used to. It stores information in networks. The amount of information available to one particular recall event depends upon the amount of experience and relevant other bits have been stored. The ability of the brain to fill in missing information based on previous experiences would also make it a very difficult to get an estimate on the true capacity. It certainly isn’t infinite as you suggest.

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  33. i am new on this conversation but i would like to share my thoughts on the capacity of human brain
    i always tried to understand how our brain works, but never got one answer but i come up with some thoughts, human brain is so much complex thing to deal with. Now when i am writing this it’s not me who is writing this and giving this theories it’s my brain so we can say our brain is also trying to know about it self. If you look at our ancestors they were less intelligent then us or we can say they have different views or understanding of things. And other generations after those came up with different understanding and and views of things or new advance technological things and human brain is growing larger generations after generations may be we know we need larger brain to store more complex things then before it is said that when we don’t need something we loose them by the time like we used to have tail but now we don’t have it because we don’t have any use for that but our brain has become larger

  34. i am new on this conversation but i would like to share my thoughts on the capacity of human brain
    i always tried to understand how our brain works, but never got one answer but i come up with some thoughts, human brain is so much complex thing to deal with. Now when i am writing this it’s not me who is writing this and giving this theories it’s my brain so we can say our brain is also trying to know about it self. If you look at our ancestors they were less intelligent then us or we can say they have different views or understanding of things. And other generations after those came up with different understanding and and views of things or new advance technological things and human brain is growing larger generations after generations may be we know we need larger brain to store more complex things then before it is said that when we don’t need something we loose them by the time like we used to have tail but now we don’t have it because we don’t have any use for that but our brain has become larger becaus

  35. we need more space to store information. We have feelings our brain decides what is wrong or right and does what is good for us our capacity can’t be measured on number we don’t know it’s true capacity so we shoul’t measure it or compare it with computers because we made them and we know how they work but we don’t know how our brain wo functions. If the space that our brain has decides how more we are going to live a person in jail should live more and a working person should die earlier because he sees and gets more informations. Our brain expands with it’s needs and it stores information which it produce it self not only those which we have seen around us. For an example dream is also a source of information it helps up to learn things faster. Our brain never rests it works until we die it makes our body work. It give information to body parts so that they function correctly. So it stores lot and lot more information then we imagine.Thing we remember speak do in daily life is a little role that our brain d

  36. My brain has at least 6 teras :7 But seriously, you guys need to watch the movie Johnny Mnemonic…classic solid saturday morning tripper material…leggo my eggo

  37. Oh yeah, I ADHD’d the previous intention of the previous post, I just wanted to note the amazing fact that this post is 4 years old :D

  38. Like Wittgenstein used to say, you cannot answer a question that is formulated incorrectly. Asking about the storage capacity of the human brain is no different than asking about the storage capacity of a calculator that can reprogram itself. The question is missing the point. Ask instead about the capacity of the brain to process information stored in the world around it.

    • A reasonable upper bound on the capacity can be derived from the data above. With 100 billion neurons, the address space to number them is ~37 bits. One can store the graph of synapse connections with one entry of 37 bits per synapse plus a synapse count per neuron (or a terminator). Average 10k synapses per neuron means this map is ~45kB/neuron, slightly larger if you include a few bits to describe the synapses and neuron types. Say we round up to 50kB x 100 billion neurons = 5,000TB. This figure is almost certainly too large by ~2x because most synapse connections are local and could be expressed with shorter relative addresses. Also, it assumes all connections lack structure, as structure reduces the information required to express the graph. (Think incompressible vs compressible data) Information theory proves that the compexity of the stored data cannot exceed that of the underlying medium, so this is the upper bound. A few TB is probably a more realistic estimate indeed, and lower is hardly out of the question.

      Keep in mind that the brain’s capacity for internal + external information processing is much larger than what we can store or even observe, and thus, our experiences tend to be richer than our memories, and both rely heavily on intelligent extrapolation. What we do store is very densely relational and bears little resemblence to the relatively direct captures that we store such as video. Those need to store far more data than we observe to be immersive because they cannot control our attention when played back. To be fully immersive they must recreate the entire environment for us to explore as they play but this is drastically more demanding than storing what we observe of them in any one viewing.

  39. I had the wonderful opportunity to fill my brain to capacity.. I don’t know how much it held, but I did see the excess leak out as a mist..

    I was running a mind experiment in a series of experiments, in which I was attempting to explore time-travel into the future.. In the trance I exited the light-speed velocity at 150 million years from now.. The planet wasn’t in its orbit then..I couldn’t find the earth anywhere near its orbit, just a lot of space debris.. I backtracked slowly, about a thousand years to the second, till The planet was there again, then more slowly till I saw movement on the planet, at the year 145,730 where I spectated “the last human cracking the marrow out of the fresh bloodied bones of the second last human”.. I nearly lost my cookies at the sight of it.. I continued backtracking toward now, slowly.. in search of what destroyed humanity and all life on the planet.. Near the year 55,000 I stopped in over a city, and lowered to the street, and searched for a government lab, and found one, a time-travel lab.. The lab techs were extremely excited at my visit.. We shared some communication.. One tech approached me, sobbing “We don’t have chocolate here, your culture extincted the chocolate tree.. Pleas tell your time to not kill the chocolate tree.. All we have now in place of chocolate is sythocolate, and it tastes like shit”.. and he cried.. I held him close, and whispered I will tell them, for all the good it will do, if you give me an encyclopedia of your time.. They gave me a memory-dot of everything they knew.. I exited, and as I approached the now, 50,000 years worth of the data leaked out of my head like a stream of vapour.. As far as answering the question “how much data does the human brain hold, I can confidentially state “the human brain can hold about 4500-years worth, which is all I retained in that experiment, but when I try to make people aware of any of it, they label me “crazy”, and they try to harm me.. I suppose humanity doesn’t want any new science…

    Anyway, future humanity asks: “please don’t extinct the chocolate tree”…

  40. “Oops”.. I just realized, that if future humanity asked that we not extinct the chocolate bush, it means the “seed-bank” failed..?

    Maybe we should install a seedbank in orbit, just in case global insanity kills all life on this planet…

    What does it matter how much does a brain or mind hold, and start doing something with what we’ve got, while we still have life on this planet..?

  41. I don’t have any spare time at the moment..
    Would someone who needs to do something, kindly send this link to all the writers guilds..? They needs new themes.. I offered them “new themes as I gets them”.. They ask that “content be submitted in first-person, for their writers to better feel the emotions suggested and explored in product”…

    Bottom-line is: If you wants better movies, give the writers your best stuff…
    “Fl;ood them with so much new stuff, that they’ll have it difficult discerning their arses from holes in the cliff…

  42. I think the brain has a very small capacity.it simply has the ability to rearrange the data as required .

  43. Pingback: Limitless

  44. I heard that the brain will take up to ten billion years to fill up one side of our brain and after that side is full the other side shall deconstruct the data and reconstruct it into a smaller size at the same time delete data that we don’t need and keeping the stuff we do need. Are brain also is meant to create new things that stores up data everytime one of those things stores data so are brains have an unlimtied amount of room.

  45. When I look at this comments about DNA having a memory of its own, like a BIOS in a normal computer that cannot be deleted, but only be updated, I can’t help but think of the idea which the video game Assassin’s Creed gave us. If, with animals, instincts can be passed on to the next generation of living creature, to have a fight or flight instinct for instance, could you decode these DNA strings and maybe find your ancestors most striking history and experiences tucked away in a compressed subsection? Could be extremely interesting.

  46. Poop poop poop poop poop poop

  47. how human brain can be utilize to store any info permanently

  48. I am confused to know how much memory do we store in our brain? Hav we to eat diet r medicne ?

  49. Hi, thanks for sharing.

  50. This made me think...

    The cake is a lie…
    (Anyone get it?)
    No? Maybe this one…
    When life gives you lemons, make life take lemons back!
    How bout now?
    Thought so.

  51. Exactly that of a good wewebsite you’ve got here. You should revise it more often. This kind of topics is my attention. Many thanks.

  52. I can’t wait until I can write programs in brainsic.. then I would never get a stack over flow error again!

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